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UBC Math Dept
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Mathematical Biology and related seminars

April, 2021
Wednesday,
April 21
Kenji Sugioka -- 2:05 pm in Zoom
UBC Zoology
Extrinsic and intrinsic controls of cortical flow regulate C. elegans embryogenesis
Abstract
Cell division is a vital mechanism for cell proliferation, but it often breaks its symmetry during animal development. Symmetry-breaking of cell division, such as the orientation of the cell division axis and asymmetry of daughter cell sizes, regulates morphogenesis and cell fate decision during embryogenesis, organogenesis, and stem cell division in a range of organisms. Despite its significance in development and disease, the mechanisms of symmetry-breaking of cell division remain unclear. Previous studies heavily focused on the mechanism of symmetry-breaking at metaphase of mitosis, wherein a localized microtubule-motor protein activity pulls the mitotic spindle. Recent studies found that cortical flow, the collective migration of the cell surface actin-myosin network, plays an independent role in the symmetry-breaking of cell division after anaphase. Using nematode C. elegans embryos, we identified extrinsic and intrinsic cues that pattern cortical flow during early embryogenesis. Each cue specifies distinct cellular arrangements and is involved in a critical developmental event such as the establishment of the left-right body axis, the dorsal-ventral body axis, and the formation of endoderm. Our research started to uncover the regulatory mechanisms underlying the cortical flow patterning during early embryogenesis.
Wednesday,
April 28
Calina Copos -- 2:05 pm in Zoom
UNC
Cell symmetry breaking for movement through a mechanochemical mechanism
Abstract
To initiate movement, cells need to form a well-defined "front" and "rear" through the process of cellular polarization. Polarization is a crucial process involved in embryonic development and cell motility and it is not yet well understood. Mathematical models that have been developed to study the onset of polarization have explored either biochemical or mechanical pathways, yet few have proposed a combined mechano-chemical mechanism. However, experimental evidence suggests that most motile cells rely on both biochemical and mechanical components to break symmetry. I will describe a mechano-chemical mathematical model for emergent organization driven by both cytoskeletal dynamics and biochemical reactions. We have identified one of the simplest quantitative frameworks for a possible mechanism for spontaneous symmetry breaking for initiation of cell movement. The framework relies on local, linear coupling between minimal biochemical stochastic and mechanical deterministic systems; this coupling between mechanics and biochemistry has been speculated biologically, yet through our model, we demonstrate it is a necessary and sufficient condition for a cell to achieve a polarized state.
May, 2021
Wednesday,
May 5
Jun Allard -- 2:05 pm in Zoom
UCI
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
May 19
Christopher Miles -- 2:05 pm in Zoom
NYU
TBA
Abstract
TBA
June, 2021
Wednesday,
June 16
Manu Madhav -- 2:05 pm in Zoom
UBC
Tba
Abstract
TBA

Seminar series sponsored by PIMS.

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