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UBC Math Dept
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Mathematical Biology and related seminars

September, 2019
Wednesday,
September 4
Geoff Schiebinger -- 2:45 pm in TBD
UBC Math
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
September 11
Khanh Dao Duc -- 2:45 pm in TBD
UBC Math
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
September 18
Sarafa Iyaniwura -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
UBC Math
TBD
Abstract
TBD
Wednesday,
September 25
Guy Tanentzapf -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
UBC
TBD
Abstract
TBD
October, 2019
Wednesday,
October 2
Tilmann Glimm -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
Western Washington University
TBD
Abstract
TBD
Wednesday,
October 9
David Holloway -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
BCIT
Leaf vein patterning: growth regulator dynamics of normal and transport-disrupted development
Abstract
The growth regulator auxin plays a central role in development across plants. Auxin spatial patterning is critical in the phyllotactic arrangement of leaves along a stem, the shapes of the leaves themselves, and venation within leaves. These patterns depend on polar auxin transport (PAT) at the cellular level, particularly the preferential allocation of PIN efflux proteins to certain areas of the plasma membrane. Two general mechanisms have been studied: an up-the-gradient (UTG) allocation dependent on neighbouring-cell auxin concentrations, and a with-the-flux (WTF) allocation dependent on the flow of auxin across walls. We developed a combined UTG+WTF model for leaf venation. The model simulates intracellular and membrane kinetics and intercellular transport, and is solved for a 2D leaf of several hundred cells. We find that vein initiation in the leaf margin and cell polarization towards new veins is UTG-driven, while WTF is critical for vein extension. UTG is important for joining veins to form a network structure. The model produces the experimentally observed succession of effects when PAT is increasingly inhibited by NPA treatment. Venation patterns are highly correlated with leaf shape; this model enables the investigation of how PAT dynamics contribute to the diversity of leaf shapes across plants.
Wednesday,
October 16
Sarah Hedtrich -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
UBC
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
October 23
Cindy Greenwood -- 2:45 pm in TBA
UBC Math
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
October 30
Clinton Durney -- 2:45 pm in TBA
UBC Math
TBA
Abstract
TBA
November, 2019
Wednesday,
November 13
Jessica Stockdale -- 2:45 pm in TBD
SFU
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
November 20
Thomas Hillen -- 2:45 pm in TBA
University of Alberta
TBA
Abstract
TBA
Friday,
November 22
Sookkyung Lim -- 2:00 pm in ESB 1012
Dept of Mathematics, University of Cincinnati
Microswimmers propelled by helical flagella: Modeling, Simulations & Analysis
Abstract
Swimming bacteria with helical flagella are self-propelled micro-swimmers in nature, and the swimming strategies of such bacteria vary depending on the number and the position of flagella on the cell body. In this talk, I will introduce two microorganisms, multi-flagellated E. coli and single-flagellated Vibrio A. The Kirchhoff rod theory is used to model the elastic helical flagella and the rod-shaped cell body is represented by a hollow ellipsoid that can translate and rotate as a neutrally buoyant rigid body interacting with a surrounding fluid. The hydrodynamic interaction between the fluid and the bacteria is described by the regularized version of Stokes flow. I will focus on how bacteria can swim and reorient swimming course for survival and how Mathematics can help to understand the swimming mechanism of such bacteria.
More info:Department Events page
Comment:This is a Department Colloquium.

Seminar series sponsored by PIMS.

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