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 Events
University of Bristol
Mon 26 Feb 2018, 3:00pm
Discrete Math Seminar
MATX 1101
Incidences in arbitrary fields
MATX 1101
Mon 26 Feb 2018, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

The Szemerédi-Trotter theorem gives a sharp upper bound on the maximum number of incidences between any finite sets of points and lines living in the real plane; this has also been extended to the complex plane. We can also ask for such an incidence bound over arbitrary fields. I will talk about two results in this direction in work joint with Frank de Zeeuw. The study of incidence bounds over the reals has found many applications in additive combinatorics; in arbitrary fields this utility remains true, and I shall present some of these applications. 

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School of Interactive Computing College of Computing GeorgiaTech
Mon 26 Feb 2018, 3:00pm SPECIAL
Institute of Applied Mathematics
ESB 2012
Optimizing physical contacts for locomotion and manipulation: turning the challenges of contacts into solutions.
ESB 2012
Mon 26 Feb 2018, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

 

Note for Attendees

Reception before the talk in ESB 4133 (the PIMS lounge). This talk is in the IAM/PIMS distinguished speaker series. 
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SFU
Mon 26 Feb 2018, 4:00pm SPECIAL
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATX 1118
Fujita's Freeness Conjecture for Complexity-One T-Varieties
MATX 1118
Mon 26 Feb 2018, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 Fujita famously conjectured that for a $d$-dimensional smooth
projective variety $X$ with ample divisor $H$, $mH+K_X$ is basepoint
free whenever $m\geq d+1$. I will discuss recent joint work with Klaus
Altmann in which we show this conjecture is true whenever $X$ admits
an effective action by a torus of dimension $d-1$.
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University of Toronto
Wed 28 Feb 2018, 3:10pm
Probability Seminar
LSK 460
The global limit of random sorting networks
LSK 460
Wed 28 Feb 2018, 3:10pm-4:10pm

Abstract


A sorting network is a shortest path from the identity to the reverse permutation in the Cayley graph of S_n generated by adjacent transpositions. An n-element uniform random sorting network displays many striking global properties as n approaches infinity. For example, scaled trajectories of the elements 1, 2, ... n converge to sine curves and the 1/2-way permutation matrix measure converges to the projected surface area measure of the 2-sphere.
 
In this talk, I will discuss how the local structure of random sorting networks can be used to find a global limit, proving these statements and more.
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ICTS, Bangalore
Wed 28 Feb 2018, 3:15pm
Mathematical Biology Seminar
ESB 4127
Data assimilation and parameter estimation
 
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