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 Events
University of Pittsburgh
Wed 1 Apr 2020, 1:45pm
Mathematical Biology Seminar
Zoom - see PIMS remote seminars for details
Follow your nose: The mathematics of olfactory navigation
Zoom - see PIMS remote seminars for details
Wed 1 Apr 2020, 1:45pm-2:45pm

Abstract


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UBC
Wed 1 Apr 2020, 3:15pm
Topology and related seminars
Zoom - contact organizers for meeting id
The Heegaard Floer Homology of (1,1) Knots
Zoom - contact organizers for meeting id
Wed 1 Apr 2020, 3:15pm-4:15am

Abstract

Looming in the background of my project, like some spooky mountain, is the L-space conjecture. Let’s just say that L-spaces are homology Lens spaces (with respect to Heegaard Floer homology) and there is a difficult question concerning them. One way to get a handle on L-spaces is to construct them by doing Dehn surgery on knots. In this talk, I will explain what (1,1) knots are, how to compute their Heegaard Floer homology and I will present the simple method due to Greene, Lewallen and Vafaee for checking almost instantly whether a (1,1) knot admits a Dehn surgery to an L-space.
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[Cancelled] Chen Wang
UBC Mathematics
Fri 3 Apr 2020, 3:00pm
Department Colloquium
ESB 2012
[Cancelled] Graduate Research Award: Nonlinear dynamics of forced baroclinic critical layers
ESB 2012
Fri 3 Apr 2020, 3:00pm-3:50pm

Abstract


Critical layers are singularities of waves propagating in shear flows, and they play crucial roles in the mixing and transition to turbulence in ocean and atmosphere. Recently, much attention has given to the `baroclinic critical layers' which arise in stratified flows with horizontal shear. The recently discovered `zombie vortices' replicate themselves through forcing the baroclinic critical layers, and the self-replication has been suggested as a possible route for the accretion of protoplanetary disks, which is the essential process in star formation. In this talk, I will present a theoretical approach to understand the evolution of forced baroclinic critical layers. We use the method of matched asymptotic analysis to tackle the fine scale of the critical layers. In linear and weakly nonlinear analysis, we derive explicit asymptotic solutions to describe the excitation and evolution of the critical layer. Our results demonstrate that the vorticity field evolves from a pair of ellipses to a dipolar stripe. We then demonstrate the dipolar stripe is unstable and thus gives rise to the secondary instability, which can explain the rollup of the stripe and the excitation of new critical layers. We have found good agreements with previous numerical simulations.
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Simon Fraser University
Mon 6 Apr 2020, 3:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATH 225
TBA
MATH 225
Mon 6 Apr 2020, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

 TBA
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Peter Sternberg
University of Indiana-Bloomington
Tue 7 Apr 2020, 3:30pm
Diff. Geom, Math. Phys., PDE Seminar
PIMS Lounge
TBA
PIMS Lounge
Tue 7 Apr 2020, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Abstract

 
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