Math 104 - Section 105 - 2014W Term 1 (Sep.-Dec. 2014)

Differential Calculus with Applications to Commerce and Social Sciences


Instructor: Kyle Hambrook
Email: hambrook at math dot ubc dot ca
Lectures: MWF at 9:00-10:00 AM in MATX 1100.
Review Sessions / Office Hours: Monday 4:00-6:00 PM and Thursday 4:00-6:00 PM in MATH 105
I'm always available right after class to answer questions about the lectures, homework, etc.
If you need to talk to me one-on-one, please email me to make an appointment.

Final Exam

The final exam will be held on Saturday, December 6, from 8:30 AM to 11:00 AM in LSK 201. Google "ubc LSK" to see where it is.
Some information about the final exam is HERE.
A sample final exam is HERE.
Try to do the sample final exam before you use THE SOLUTION TO THE SAMPLE FINAL EXAM.
You can find more practice exams with hints and solutions HERE. (The Math Club is essentially selling a print-out of the solutions already available on this website.)
The Math Learning Center is a good place to study and get help. MLC.

Math 104 Common Course Website

Math 104 Common Course Website
This website contains course policies, textbook information, exam dates, WebWork information, practice problems, supplementary notes, a week-by-week topics schedule, and detailed week-by-week learning goals.

Notes

Notes


Grading Scheme

Your grade normally will be computed based on the following formula:
50% Final Exam + 17% First Midterm + 17% Second Midterm + 10% Webwork Homework + 6% Quizzes.

Textbook

The required textbook for this course is Calculus: Early Transcendentals with student solutions manual, Volume 1. Fourth custom edition for UBC, by Briggs, Cochran and Gillett. The textbook is available at the UBC Bookstore. ISBN 10 digit: 1-269-91047-7. ISBN 13 digit: 978-269-91047-7. This book is available at the UBC Bookstore.

In other editions of the textbook there may be small differences in content, some of the problems may be different or may be numbered differently, and a student solutions manual may not be included. It will be up to you to deal with any such potential inconsistencies if you use a different edition of the text.

Midterm Exams

Exam policies are on the common course website.

Midterm 1
Midterm Exam 1 will be held on October 3 (Friday) at 6:00 - 7:00 PM in CHEM D200. Google "ubc chem building" to see where it is.
A sample Midterm 1 is HERE . You should try to do the sample Midterm 1 before you use THE SOLUTIONS TO MIDTERM 1.
For Midterm 1 you will be expected to know the material from sections 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.6, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6 in the textbook and the supplementary notes on business problems here.
Midterm 1 will NOT cover Elasticity in 3.6.
The weekly learning goals and the accompanying practice problems outline precisely what you are expected to know.
Midterm 1 consists of 6 questions, and you will have one hour to do it.
No calculators, notes, or other aids are allowed.
You need to bring your student ID to do Midterm 1.
SOLUTIONS to Midterm 1 (Version 1).
SOLUTIONS to Midterm 1 (Version 2).
SOLUTIONS to make-up midterm 1.

Midterm 2
Midterm exam 2 will be held on November 12 (Wednesday) at 6:30 - 7:30 PM in in CHEM D200. Google "ubc chem building" to see where it is.
A sample Midterm 2 is HERE . You should try to do the sample Midterm 2 before you use THE SOLUTION TO THE SAMPLE MIDTERM 2.
For Midterm 2 you will be expected to know the material from sections 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, 3.11, 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, vertical asymptotes in 2.4, horizontal asymptotes in 2.5, and the online supplementary notes: Ch. 6.8, price elasticity of demand, continuous compound interest.
SOLUTIONS to Midterm 2 (Version 1).
SOLUTIONS to Midterm 2 (Version 2).

If you have a time conflict with either midterm and another course, send me an email that contains

WebWork

WebWork
About 10 to 17 problems will be posted on WebWork each week and will be due the following week. These problems are common to all sections of Math 104. The "Email Instructor" link goes to the graduate teaching assistant in charge of WebWork for the course.

Quizzes

When? Every Friday near the end of class.
How much time? 10 minutes.
What's on the quiz? A week before each quiz, I will post a list of problems from the textbook that are eligible to appear on the quiz. The quiz will consist of a few randomly selected problems from the list. The numbers and functions in the quiz problems may change, but the core of the problem will remain the same.
What if you miss a quiz? If you miss a quiz, you will receive a mark of zero unless you provide a documented excuse, in which case the weight of the missed quiz will be transferred to the other quizzes. Examples of valid excuses are an illness which has been documented by a physician and Student Health Services, or an absence to play a varsity sport (your coach will provide you with a letter).
Are calculators allowed? No. And you won't need one anyway.

Eligible Quiz Problems

Problem numbers are for the 4th edition of the textbook. In other editions, the numbering may be different.

September 12: September 19: September 26: October 3: October 10: October 17: October 24: October 31: November 7: November 14: November 21: November 28:

Learning Goals and Practice Problems

Learning Goals
This page contains detailed week-by-week learning goals. It explains the specific skills and principles you are expected to learn and demonstrate on exams.

Practice Problems
This page contains a list of problems from the textbook. These are not to be turned in, but working through them will help crystallize the concepts covered in class. Not all parts of a textbook section will be emphasized equally in lectures, and these problems serve as guidelines for identifying the important and relevant parts that constitute the course syllabus. Exam questions will be largely modelled on these problems.

Study Resources

Past Final Exams
Past Final Exams with Hints and Full Solutions
Drop-in Math Tutoring
AMS Tutoring Services


Philosophy and Advice

My role as instructor of this course is to support you in learning and demonstrating your understanding of the course content as defined by the learning goals and practice problems above. The lectures, review sessions, quizzes, and all other interactions I have with you as a student are designed around this principle. If something is unclear in class, if you need help with a problem, or if you need study advice, please ask me. If you are feeling overwhelmed, please talk to me.

In class, we will focus on building a strong foundation of the fundamental skills and principles that you will learn to apply in this course. The examples presented in class will be chosen to simply and clearly demonstrate these skills and principles.

I believe that learning is a process that requires substantial practice applying the skills and principles introduced in class and the textbook. This practice will mainly come through solving the WebWork problems and studying for the quizzes and exams. Below I give some advice on how, and how much, to practice.

WebWork
Solve all the WebWork problems. It's fine to get help from your classmates, me, or others. Read your textbook and notes as you work through the problems to find relevant formulas and examples. Don't wait until the last minute to start working on the WebWork problems.

Studying for Quizzes
Solve all the eligible quiz problems, if necessary with help from classmates, myself, or others. Then solve them again on your own. Try to solve the problems repeatedly until you no longer need to refer to your textbook, notes, or previous solutions, and the process of solving them becomes nearly automatic. Getting to this point is not as hard as it sounds. You'll probably find that by the third time you solve a problem, you have already internalized most of the process and barely have to check your notes at all. If you do this, the quizzes will be easy.

Studying for Exams
Collect all the eligible quiz problems, all the sample exam problems, and all the Webwork Problems. Solve all the problems in the collection, if necessary with help from classmates, myself, or others. Then solve them again on your own. Try to solve the problems repeatedly until you no longer need to refer to your textbook, notes, or previous solutions, and the process of solving them becomes nearly automatic. Getting to this point is not as hard as it sounds. You'll probably find that by the third time you solve a problem, you have already internalized most of the process and barely have to check your notes at all. If you do this, the exams will be easy. If you have the time, include in the collection problems from the list of practice problems above or problems from past years' exams.