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UBC Math Dept
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Mathematical Biology and related seminars

January, 2019
Wednesday,
January 9
Sergei Maslov -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
Dept.BioEng, Dept.Physics, C.R.Woese Institute f. Genomic Biol.,Univ.of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
What’s love got to do with it? Stable marriage in microbial ecosystems.
Abstract
Microbial communities routinely have several alternative stable states observed for the same environmental parameters. A possibility of sudden and irreversible transitions between these states (regime shifts) complicates external manipulation of these systems. Can we predict which specific perturbations may induce such regime shifts and which would have only a transient effect? Here I will describe several new conceptual models that exhibit these emergent phenomena. Two of our models [2,3] were inspired by a decades-old economics work: the stable marriage or stable allocation problem, developed by Gale and Shapley in the 1960s and awarded the Nobel prize in economics in 2012. Using only the ranked tables of nutrient preferences and competitive abilities of microbes, we can determine all stable states and specific perturbations driving the system from one state to another.
Wednesday,
January 16
Katie Faulkner -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
Department of Mathematics, UBC
WIP talk
Wednesday,
January 30
Frederic Paquin-Lefebvre -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
Department of Mathematics, UBC
TBA
Abstract
TBA
February, 2019
Wednesday,
February 6
Joy Richman -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
Dept of Dentistry, UBC
Coordination of mesenchymal cell movements is required for facial morphogenesis
Abstract
TBA
Wednesday,
February 13
Clinton Durney -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
Department of Mathematics, UBC
Modelling Salivary Gland Tubulogenesis: From 2D Sheet to 3D Structure
Abstract
TBA
March, 2019
Wednesday,
March 6
Douglas Altshuler -- 2:45 pm in ESB 4127
UBC Zoology
Biomechanics and neural control of complex locomotion
Abstract
My research program is motivated by fascination with bird flight. My laboratory group uses a multi-disciplinary approach that includes biomechanics, physiology, and neuroscience to examine flight ability. Our current research is organized around two topics: 1) how birds morph their wings and what benefits this provides; and 2) how optic flow signals are encoded in the avian brain and used to guide their flight. As we gain understanding of flight mechanisms, we further endeavor to apply comparative approaches that provide deeper insight into avian ecology and evolution.
More info:
Monday,
March 11
Paul Kulesa -- 3:00 pm in TBA
Srowers Medical Institute
TBA
This seminar is part of the IAM Colloquium Series.
Comment:Distinguished IAM Colloquium

Seminar series sponsored by PIMS.

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