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 Events
UC Davis
Mon 18 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATH 126
Knot invariants and Hilbert schemes
MATH 126
Mon 18 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 I will discuss some recent results and conjectures relating knot invariants (such as HOMFLY-PT polynomial and Khovanov-Rozansky homology) to algebraic geometry of Hilbert schemes of points on the plane. All notions will be introduced in the talk, no preliminary knowledge is assumed. This is a joint work with Andrei Negut and Jacob Rasmussen.
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Uri Ascher
Department of Computer Science, UBC
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 12:30pm
Scientific Computation and Applied & Industrial Mathematics
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Numerical Analysis in Visual Computing: not too little, not too much
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Abstract


Visual computing is a wide area that includes computer graphics and image processing, where the ``eyeball-norm'' rules.

I will briefly discuss two case studies involving numerical methods and analysis applied to this area. The first involves motion simulation and calibration of soft objects such as cloth, plants and skin. The governing elastodynamics PDE system, discretized in space already at the variational level using co-rotated FEM, leads to a large, expensive to assemble, dynamical system in time, where the damped motion may mask highly oscillatory stiffness. Geometric integration ideas are making their way into visual computing research these days in search for more quantitative computations.

The other case study involves some image processing problems where there is a premium for local approaches that do not necessarily use underlying PDEs. I will demonstrate and discuss.

The examples used are from several published or submitted papers.
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Georg Wechslberger
Technical University of Munich
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
LSK 306
Overview of the Julia programming language: an 8 hour minicourse
LSK 306
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-5:30pm

Details


Course description: The Julia programming language is designed to be a high level language for numerical computing, that is as fast as C or Fortran, despite employing a high level syntax. Since its first release in 2012 it has been continually improved and build a fast growing community around it.

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the key concepts of the Julia programming language as well as explain the advantages over other languages designed for numerical computing, as e.g. Matlab or R. Furthermore it demonstrates how readily available packages developed with Julia can be used to solve common problems occurring in numerical analysis, such as - linear systems of equations - non linear systems of equations - ordinary differential equations - linear programs. The course will also cover the basic tasks frequently encountered by numerical analysts: benchmarking, plotting and debugging. If time permits we will also explore possibilities for using Julia in deep learning applications.


Note for Attendees

Future Dates/Times of this ongoing minicourse: Wednesday, Sep 20, 3:00-5:30pm, Thursday, Sep 21 3:00-5:30pm.
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Tokyo Institute of Technology
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:30pm
Diff. Geom, Math. Phys., PDE Seminar
ESB 2012
On uniqueness for the harmonic map heat flow in supercritical dimensions
ESB 2012
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Abstract

We examine the question of uniqueness for the equivariant reduction of the harmonic map heat flow in the energy supercritical dimension. It is shown that, generically, singular data can give rise to two distinct solutions which are both stable, and satisfy the local energy inequality. We also discuss how uniqueness can be retrieved. This is a joint work with Pierre Germain and Tej-Eddine Ghoul.
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University of Victoria
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm
Probability Seminar
ESB 2012
A characterization of the GFF
ESB 2012
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

We characterize the GFF as the only random distribution which is conformally invariant and satisfies a domain Markov property. Joint work with Nathanael Berestycki and Ellen Powell.
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Georg Wechslberger
Technical University of Munich
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
LSK 306
Overview of the Julia programming Language: an 8 hour minicourse Part II
LSK 306
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-5:30pm

Details

Course description: The Julia programming language is designed to be a high level language for numerical computing, that is as fast as C or Fortran, despite employing a high level syntax. Since its first release in 2012 it has been continually improved and build a fast growing community around it.

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the key concepts of the Julia programming language as well as explain the advantages over other languages designed for numerical computing, as e.g. Matlab or R. Furthermore it demonstrates how readily available packages developed with Julia can be used to solve common problems occurring in numerical analysis, such as - linear systems of equations - non linear systems of equations - ordinary differential equations - linear programs. The course will also cover the basic tasks frequently encountered by numerical analysts: benchmarking, plotting and debugging. If time permits we will also explore possibilities for using Julia in deep learning applications.
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CINVESTAV
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:15pm
Topology and related seminars
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Hopf invariants in the motion planning problem
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:15pm-4:15pm

Abstract

Hopf invariants, a basic construction in homotopy theory, are closely related to Lusternik–Schnirelmann category which, in turn, can be defined as the sectional category of a certain evaluation map. In this talk I'll introduce the notion of Hopf invariants for general fibrations and exhibit a connection between the Hopf invariants for a product fibration and those for the factors. Applications will be drawn to the motion planning problem.

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George Wechslberger
Technical University of Munich
Thu 21 Sep 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
LSK 306
Overview of the Julia programming language: an 8 hour minicourse Part III
LSK 306
Thu 21 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-5:30pm

Details

Course description: The Julia programming language is designed to be a high level language for numerical computing, that is as fast as C or Fortran, despite employing a high level syntax. Since its first release in 2012 it has been continually improved and build a fast growing community around it.

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the key concepts of the Julia programming language as well as explain the advantages over other languages designed for numerical computing, as e.g. Matlab or R. Furthermore it demonstrates how readily available packages developed with Julia can be used to solve common problems occurring in numerical analysis, such as - linear systems of equations - non linear systems of equations - ordinary differential equations - linear programs. The course will also cover the basic tasks frequently encountered by numerical analysts: benchmarking, plotting and debugging. If time permits we will also explore possibilities for using Julia in deep learning applications.
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UBC Math
Fri 22 Sep 2017, 3:00pm
Department Colloquium
ESB 2012
Some directions in analysis and geometry of probability measures
ESB 2012
Fri 22 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

Probability measures are key objects in many scientific and engineering areas that deal with randomness, distributions, data sets, etc. When coupled with optimization, many interesting questions naturally arise. In this talk, I will explain a few of such questions from the point of view of optimal transport theory, which gives a natural and robust framework for studying probability measures. These involve among others, matching probability measures in an optimal way following certain rules (e.g martingale), as well as finding geometric averages between probability measures.  
 

Note for Attendees

Light refreshments will be served in ESB 4133, the PIMS Lounge before this colloquium.
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