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 Events
UCSD
Tue 28 Feb 2017, 10:00am SPECIAL
Number Theory Seminar / PIMS Seminars and PDF Colloquiums
ESB 4127
Representations in Arithmetic: Adic spaces (Lecture 3)
ESB 4127
Tue 28 Feb 2017, 10:00am-11:00am

Abstract

This event is part of the PIMS Focus Group on Representations in Arithmetic - see the PIMS page for the talk.

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UBC Math
Tue 28 Feb 2017, 3:30pm
Diff. Geom, Math. Phys., PDE Seminar
ESB 2012
Optimal Mass transport as a natural extension of classical mechanics to the manifold of probability measures
ESB 2012
Tue 28 Feb 2017, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Abstract

I will describe how deterministic and stochastic dynamic optimal mass transports are to Mean Field Games what the classical calculus of variations offers to classical mechanics.
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UCSD
Tue 28 Feb 2017, 3:30pm SPECIAL
Number Theory Seminar
ESB 4127
The unreasonable effectiveness of p-adic Hodge theory
ESB 4127
Tue 28 Feb 2017, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Abstract

As its name is meant to suggest, the subject of p-adic Hodge theory was historically concerned with the relationship between different cohomology theories attached to p-adic algebraic varieties. Within p-adic Hodge theory, the concept of a perfectoid space (discussed in my PIMS lectures) arose quite naturally and has led to improvements in the subject which were in some sense "expected".

However, it also had several "unexpected" applications rather far afield. We'll survey three of these: Deligne's weight-monodromy conjecture (Scholze); Galois representations associated to torsion cohomology of arithmetic groups (Scholze, Caraiani-Scholze); and the direct summand conjecture of commutative algebra (Andre, Bhatt).
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UBC Zoology
Wed 1 Mar 2017, 3:00pm
Probability Seminar
ESB 2012
Fixation Probability when Selection Occurs in Both Haploid and Diploid phases
ESB 2012
Wed 1 Mar 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

Joint work with Kazuhiro Bessho. Classical population genetic theory generally assumes either a fully haploid or fully diploid life cycle. However, many
organisms exhibit more complex life cycles, with both free-living haploid and diploid stages. Here we ask what the probability of fixation is for selected alleles in organisms with selection acting on both haploid and diploid phases of a sexual life cycle,  based on both a Moran model and a Wright–Fisher model. Applying a branching process approximation, we obtain  an accurate fixation probability assuming that the population is large and the net effect of the mutation is beneficial. We also find the diffusion approximation for the fixation probability, which is accurate even in small populations and for deleterious alleles, as long as selection is weak. These fixation probabilities from branching process and diffusion approximations are similar when selection is weak for beneficial mutations that are not fully recessive. In many cases, particularly when one phase predominates, the fixation probability differs substantially for haploid-diploid organisms compared to either fully haploid or diploid species.
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Roger Donaldson
Adjunct Professor, UBC Mathematics and CEO Midvale Applied Mathematics
Wed 1 Mar 2017, 3:00pm
Institute of Applied Mathematics / PIMS Seminars and PDF Colloquiums
Michael Smith Labs, Room 101
The Promising Future of Mathematics in Industry
Michael Smith Labs, Room 101
Wed 1 Mar 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

The diversity of mathematics and roles of mathematicians in industry has expanded greatly over the last decade.   The first part of this talk is a survey of work that I have done as an applied mathematician working in industry.  Areas include modeling groundwater flow for soil remediation, image editing, content-based image search, and machine learning for searching large satellite images.

The second part of this talk will focus on a particular use of mathematics in indexing high dimensional floating-point vectors using a search engine intended for text.  The result is a database search method that can combine "fuzzy" data, such as image textures or audio recordings, with text-based data such as document titles or descriptive keywords in an infrastructure easy for a software engineer to build and maintain.

The ultimate purpose of this talk is to highlight areas of mathematics of particular use to my work in industry, and hence of particular interest to future industrial practitioners.

Note for Attendees

This is a talk in the new BC Data Colloquium. 

Convene beforehand for PIMS tea in the PIMS lounge at 14:45

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Paris 7
Thu 2 Mar 2017, 3:30pm
Number Theory Seminar / PIMS Seminars and PDF Colloquiums
ESB 4127
TBA
ESB 4127
Thu 2 Mar 2017, 3:30pm-5:00pm

Abstract

TBA

(This talk is part of the PIMS focus semester on the mod p Langlands program).
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University of California, San Diego
Fri 3 Mar 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
Department Colloquium
ESB2012
PIMS-UBC Distinguished Colloquium--Sequences: random, structured or something in between
ESB2012
Fri 3 Mar 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

There are many fundamental problems concerning sequences that arise in many areas of mathematics and computation.  Typical problems include finding or avoiding patterns;
testing or validating various `random-like’ behavior; analyzing or comparing different statistics, etc. In this talk, we will examine various notions of regularity or irregularity for  sequences and mention numerous open problems.

Note for Attendees

Refreshments will be served in ESB 4133 from 2:45pm-3:00pm.
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Donghai Pan
Stanford University
Mon 6 Mar 2017, 3:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATX 1102
Galois cyclic covers of the projective line and pencils of Fermat hypersurfaces
MATX 1102
Mon 6 Mar 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

Classically, there are two objects that are particularly interesting to algebraic geometers: hyperelliptic curves and quadrics. The connection between these two seemingly unrelated objects was first revealed by M. Reid, which roughly says that there’s a correspondence between hyperelliptic curves and pencil of quadrics. I’ll give a brief review of Reid’s work and then describe a higher degree generalization of the correspondence.
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