Mathematics Dept.
  Events
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 9:00am SPECIAL
MATH 104
Qualifying Exams - Analysis
MATH 104
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 9:00am-12:00pm

Details

For more information on Qualifying Exams, please visit http://www.math.ubc.ca/Grad/QualifyingExams/index.shtml
Lunch (pizza) will be provided in Math 126  for students writing the Analysis exam.
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Tue 4 Sep 2018, 1:00pm SPECIAL
MATH 104
Qualifying Exams - Algebra
MATH 104
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Details

For more info, please visit http://www.math.ubc.ca/Grad/QualifyingExams/index.shtml
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Tue 4 Sep 2018, 1:00pm SPECIAL
MATH 104
Qualifying Exams - Differential Equations
MATH 104
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Details

For more info, please visit http://www.math.ubc.ca/Grad/QualifyingExams/index.shtml
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UBC
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 3:30pm
Diff. Geom, Math. Phys., PDE Seminar
MATH 105 [The NEW LOCATION!]
The Dyson Game (joint work with R. Carmona and M. Cerenzia)
MATH 105 [The NEW LOCATION!]
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Abstract

 The Dyson game is an explicitly solvable N player dynamic game that admits Dyson Brownian motion as a Nash equilibrium.  The game is motivated by the real world phenomenon found in the spacing of buses, parked cars and perched birds, which exhibit random matrix statistics (i.e. Dyson Brownian motion). We find the optimal repulsion parameter (universality class) of the equilibrium depends on the information available to the players, furthering the understanding of an open problem in random matrix theory proposed by Deift. The limiting mean field game has a local cost term, which depends on the optimal universality class due to the nontrivial asymptotic behavior of the players.  We solve the mean field game master equation and the associated Hamilton-Jacobi equation on Wasserstein space exactly, and we discuss how generalizing our results will require answering novel questions on the analysis of these equations on infinite dimensional spaces.
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Tue 4 Sep 2018, 4:30pm SPECIAL
MATH 125
Department Graduate Orientation
MATH 125
Tue 4 Sep 2018, 4:30pm-6:00pm

Details

Refreshments available.
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University of Washington
Wed 5 Sep 2018, 3:15pm
Topology and related seminars
PIMS 4133
PIMS 4133
Wed 5 Sep 2018, 3:15pm-4:15pm

Abstract

 TBA
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Elana Kalashnikov
Imperial College London
Mon 10 Sep 2018, 4:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
TBA
TBA
TBA
Mon 10 Sep 2018, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 TBA
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Wed 12 Sep 2018, 3:45pm SPECIAL
PIMS Lounge, ESB Bldg.
PIMS Afternoon Tea
PIMS Lounge, ESB Bldg.
Wed 12 Sep 2018, 3:45pm-4:15pm

Details

The PIMS tea will be held on Wednesdays in term 1 starting September 12th.
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UCLA
Thu 13 Sep 2018, 4:00pm SPECIAL
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
TBA
Hodge theory of classifying stacks
TBA
Thu 13 Sep 2018, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

The goal of this talk is to create a correspondence between the representation theory of algebraic groups and the topology of Lie groups. The idea is to study the Hodge theory of the classifying stack of a reductive group over a field of characteristic p, the case of characteristic 0 having been studied by Behrend, Bott, Simpson and Teleman. The approach yields new calculations in representation theory, motivated by topology. 
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UCLA
Fri 14 Sep 2018, 4:00pm
Department Colloquium
ESB 2012
Birational geometry and algebraic cycles
ESB 2012
Fri 14 Sep 2018, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 A fundamental problem of algebraic geometry is to determine which algebraic varieties are rational, that is, isomorphic to projective space after removing lower-dimensional subvarieties
from both sides. We discuss the history of the problem. Some dramatic progress in the past 5 years uses a new tool in this context: the Chow group of algebraic cycles. 

Note for Attendees

Refreshments will be served in ESB 4133 from 2:45 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
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University of Massachusets
Mon 24 Sep 2018, 4:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
TBA
TBA
TBA
Mon 24 Sep 2018, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 TBA
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UBC Math
Fri 28 Sep 2018, 4:00pm
Department Colloquium
ESB 2012
Integers in many-body quantum physics
ESB 2012
Fri 28 Sep 2018, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

Although integers are ubiquitous in quantum physics, they have different mathematical origins. In this colloquium, I will give a glimpse of how integers arise as either topological invariants or as analytic indices, as is the case in the so-called quantum Hall effect. I will explain the difficulties arising in extending well-known arguments when one relaxes the approximation that the particles effectively do not interact with each other in matter. Recent advances have made such realistic generalizations possible.
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