Print Friendly printer friendly
 Events
Professor Lord Martin Rees
Cambridge, UK
Fri 1 Sep 2017, 7:30pm SPECIAL
Hebb Main Lecture Theatre, UBC Campus
From Mars to the Multiverse
Hebb Main Lecture Theatre, UBC Campus
Fri 1 Sep 2017, 7:30pm-9:00pm

Details

For those in Vancouver on the Labour Day weekend, we have a really spectacular public event, on Friday evening (1st September). Lord Rees, from Cambridge (UK) will give a public lecture on "Mars and the Multiverse"; the abstract is below. Rees, one of the 20th century's most important astrophysicists, has also written on many other topics. He is well known around the world as a public speaker, particularly on our place in the universe as we now understand it, how to reconcile the findings of astronomy with religion, and the future of the human race. The talk he will give at UBC will allow extensive audience participation and dialogue with him, with plenty of opportunity for questions and discussion with him. This promises to be a really exceptional event. The talk will be suitable for the general public, including high school students.
 
Abstract:
In the year 2017, unmanned spacecraft have visited all the planets of our Solar System, and even some of their moons, and extensively explored Mars.

Many thousands of planets have been found orbiting other stars -- some of  these planets even resembling our Earth. Looking further afield, observers have probed galaxies and the massive back holes at their centres, and checked models of their evolution by detecting them all the way back to their formation. Indeed we can trace pre-galactic history back to a nanosecond after the 'Big Bang'. But the key features of our universe -- its expansion rate, geometry and content -- were established far earlier even than this, at a time that precision measurements are now trying to probe.

All these advances pose key questions: What does the long-range cosmic future hold? Should we be surprised at the emergence of life? Is physical reality even vaster than what we can see? Are there many 'big bangs' and many universes? In this illustrated talk I will address these questions.
 
 For more details, go to 

http://pitp.physics.ubc.ca/quant_lect/2017/Rees.html

More details on Martin Rees:

Prof Martin Rees  (Baron Rees of Ludlow)
 
Martin Rees is one of the pioneers of modern astrophysics, and played a key role in our understanding of black holes. A Professor at Cambridge University, he has also been successively Astronomer Royal (UK), and President of the Royal Society (London). He is well-known to the general public for his popular books and for his public lectures - the one he will give at UBC in the evening of Sept 1st is for the general public, from 16 years upwards.
hide
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 9:00am SPECIAL
MATX 1102
Qualifying Exams - Analysis
MATX 1102
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 9:00am-12:00pm

Details

For more information on Qualifying Exams, please visit http://www.math.ubc.ca/Grad/QualifyingExams/index.shtml
Lunch will be provided in  MATX 1101 for students writing the Analysis exam.
hide
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 1:00pm SPECIAL
MATX 1102
Qualifying Exams - Algebra
MATX 1102
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Details

For more info, please visit http://www.math.ubc.ca/Grad/QualifyingExams/index.shtml
hide
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 1:00pm SPECIAL
MATX 1102
Qualifying Exams - Differential Equations
MATX 1102
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Details

For more info, please visit http://www.math.ubc.ca/Grad/QualifyingExams/index.shtml
hide
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 4:30pm SPECIAL
MATH 125
Department Graduate Orientation
MATH 125
Tue 5 Sep 2017, 4:30pm-6:00pm

Details


hide
UBC
Mon 11 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATH 126
Dynamics on automorphism groups of compact Kähler manifolds
MATH 126
Mon 11 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

Given a compact Kähler manifold X and a biholomorphic self-map g of X, the topological entropy of g plays an important role in the study of dynamical system (X, g). In this talk, I first talk about a generalization of a surface result, that is, a parabolic automorphism of a compact Kähler surface preserves an elliptic fibration, to hyperkähler manifolds. We give a criterion for the existence of equivariant fibrations on ‘certain’ hyperkähler manifolds from a dynamical viewpoint. Next, I will generalize a finiteness result for the null-entropy subset of a commutative automorphism group due to Dinh–Sibony (2004), to arbitrary virtually solvable groups G of maximal dynamical rank. This is based on joint work with T.-C. Dinh, J. Keum, and D.-Q. Zhang.
hide
Brian Chan
Tue 12 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Discrete Math Seminar
ESB 4127
DM Committee Meeting
ESB 4127
Tue 12 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract


hide
Wed 13 Sep 2017, 2:45pm SPECIAL
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
PIMS Afternoon Tea runs weekly until November 29, 2017
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Wed 13 Sep 2017, 2:45pm-3:15pm

Details


hide
U Chicago
Thu 14 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Discrete Math Seminar
ESB 4127
Duality theory via Fourier-Motzkin elimination
ESB 4127
Thu 14 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 
We explore how Fourier-Motzkin elimination, a standard tool in finite dimensional linear programming, can be used to understand the duality theory of more general optimization problems, including semi-infinite linear, convex and conic programming.
 

 

This is joint work with Amitabh Basu (Johns Hopkins) and Kipp Martin (University of Chicago).

hide
UC Davis
Mon 18 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATH 126
Knot invariants and Hilbert schemes
MATH 126
Mon 18 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

 I will discuss some recent results and conjectures relating knot invariants (such as HOMFLY-PT polynomial and Khovanov-Rozansky homology) to algebraic geometry of Hilbert schemes of points on the plane. All notions will be introduced in the talk, no preliminary knowledge is assumed. This is a joint work with Andrei Negut and Jacob Rasmussen.
hide
Uri Ascher
Department of Computer Science, UBC
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 12:30pm
Scientific Computation and Applied & Industrial Mathematics
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Numerical Analysis in Visual Computing: not too little, not too much
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Abstract


Visual computing is a wide area that includes computer graphics and image processing, where the ``eyeball-norm'' rules.

I will briefly discuss two case studies involving numerical methods and analysis applied to this area. The first involves motion simulation and calibration of soft objects such as cloth, plants and skin. The governing elastodynamics PDE system, discretized in space already at the variational level using co-rotated FEM, leads to a large, expensive to assemble, dynamical system in time, where the damped motion may mask highly oscillatory stiffness. Geometric integration ideas are making their way into visual computing research these days in search for more quantitative computations.

The other case study involves some image processing problems where there is a premium for local approaches that do not necessarily use underlying PDEs. I will demonstrate and discuss.

The examples used are from several published or submitted papers.
hide
Georg Wechslberger
Technical University of Munich
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
LSK 306
Overview of the Julia programming language: an 8 hour minicourse
LSK 306
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-5:30pm

Details


Course description: The Julia programming language is designed to be a high level language for numerical computing, that is as fast as C or Fortran, despite employing a high level syntax. Since its first release in 2012 it has been continually improved and build a fast growing community around it.

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the key concepts of the Julia programming language as well as explain the advantages over other languages designed for numerical computing, as e.g. Matlab or R. Furthermore it demonstrates how readily available packages developed with Julia can be used to solve common problems occurring in numerical analysis, such as - linear systems of equations - non linear systems of equations - ordinary differential equations - linear programs. The course will also cover the basic tasks frequently encountered by numerical analysts: benchmarking, plotting and debugging. If time permits we will also explore possibilities for using Julia in deep learning applications.


Note for Attendees

Future Dates/Times of this ongoing minicourse: Wednesday, Sep 20, 3:00-5:30pm, Thursday, Sep 21 3:00-5:30pm.
hide
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:30pm
Diff. Geom, Math. Phys., PDE Seminar
ESB 2012
On uniqueness for the harmonic map heat flow in supercritical dimensions
ESB 2012
Tue 19 Sep 2017, 3:30pm-4:30pm

Abstract

We examine the question of uniqueness for the equivariant reduction of the harmonic map heat flow in the energy supercritical dimension. It is shown that, generically, singular data can give rise to two distinct solutions which are both stable, and satisfy the local energy inequality. We also discuss how uniqueness can be retrieved. This is a joint work with Pierre Germain and Tej-Eddine Ghoul.
hide
University of Victoria
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm
Probability Seminar
ESB 2012
A characterization of the GFF
ESB 2012
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

We characterize the GFF as the only random distribution which is conformally invariant and satisfies a domain Markov property. Joint work with Nathanael Berestycki and Ellen Powell.
hide
Georg Wechslberger
Technical University of Munich
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
LSK 306
Overview of the Julia programming Language: an 8 hour minicourse Part II
LSK 306
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-5:30pm

Details

Course description: The Julia programming language is designed to be a high level language for numerical computing, that is as fast as C or Fortran, despite employing a high level syntax. Since its first release in 2012 it has been continually improved and build a fast growing community around it.

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the key concepts of the Julia programming language as well as explain the advantages over other languages designed for numerical computing, as e.g. Matlab or R. Furthermore it demonstrates how readily available packages developed with Julia can be used to solve common problems occurring in numerical analysis, such as - linear systems of equations - non linear systems of equations - ordinary differential equations - linear programs. The course will also cover the basic tasks frequently encountered by numerical analysts: benchmarking, plotting and debugging. If time permits we will also explore possibilities for using Julia in deep learning applications.
hide
CINVESTAV
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:15pm
Topology and related seminars
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Hopf invariants in the motion planning problem
ESB 4133 (PIMS Lounge)
Wed 20 Sep 2017, 3:15pm-4:15pm

Abstract

Hopf invariants, a basic construction in homotopy theory, are closely related to Lusternik–Schnirelmann category which, in turn, can be defined as the sectional category of a certain evaluation map. In this talk I'll introduce the notion of Hopf invariants for general fibrations and exhibit a connection between the Hopf invariants for a product fibration and those for the factors. Applications will be drawn to the motion planning problem.

hide
George Wechslberger
Technical University of Munich
Thu 21 Sep 2017, 3:00pm SPECIAL
LSK 306
Overview of the Julia programming language: an 8 hour minicourse Part III
LSK 306
Thu 21 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-5:30pm

Details

Course description: The Julia programming language is designed to be a high level language for numerical computing, that is as fast as C or Fortran, despite employing a high level syntax. Since its first release in 2012 it has been continually improved and build a fast growing community around it.

The aim of this course is to give an overview of the key concepts of the Julia programming language as well as explain the advantages over other languages designed for numerical computing, as e.g. Matlab or R. Furthermore it demonstrates how readily available packages developed with Julia can be used to solve common problems occurring in numerical analysis, such as - linear systems of equations - non linear systems of equations - ordinary differential equations - linear programs. The course will also cover the basic tasks frequently encountered by numerical analysts: benchmarking, plotting and debugging. If time permits we will also explore possibilities for using Julia in deep learning applications.
hide
UBC Math
Fri 22 Sep 2017, 3:00pm
Department Colloquium
ESB 2012
Some directions in analysis and geometry of probability measures
ESB 2012
Fri 22 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

Probability measures are key objects in many scientific and engineering areas that deal with randomness, distributions, data sets, etc. When coupled with optimization, many interesting questions naturally arise. In this talk, I will explain a few of such questions from the point of view of optimal transport theory, which gives a natural and robust framework for studying probability measures. These involve among others, matching probability measures in an optimal way following certain rules (e.g martingale), as well as finding geometric averages between probability measures.  
 

Note for Attendees

Light refreshments will be served in ESB 4133, the PIMS Lounge before this colloquium.
hide
UBC
Mon 25 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Algebraic Geometry Seminar
MATH 126
A power structure over the Grothendieck ring of geometric dg categories
MATH 126
Mon 25 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

The notion of a power structure is closely related to that of a lambda ring. It is a powerful way to encode operations on certain generating functions. Gusein-Zade, Luengo, and Melle-Hernandez have defined a power structure over the Grothendieck ring of varieties. I will discuss an analog of this on a version of the Grothendieck ring of pretriangulated categories, whose elements represent enhancements of derived categories of coherent sheaves on varieties.
hide
USC
Tue 26 Sep 2017, 4:00pm
Discrete Math Seminar
ESB 4127
Combinatorial bases of polynomials
ESB 4127
Tue 26 Sep 2017, 4:00pm-5:00pm

Abstract

We establish a poset structure on combinatorial bases of polynomials, defined by positive expansions. These bases include the well-studied Schubert polynomials, Demazure characters and Demazure atoms, as well as the recently-introduced slide and quasi-key bases. The product of a Schur polynomial and an element of a basis in the poset expands positively in that basis; in particular we give the first Littlewood-Richardson rule for the product of a Schur polynomial and a quasi-key polynomial, extending the rule of Haglund, Luoto, Mason and van Willigenburg for quasi-Schur polynomials. We also establish bijections connecting combinatorial models for these polynomials, including semi-skyline fillings and quasi-key tableaux.
hide
The University of Melbourne
Wed 27 Sep 2017, 3:00pm
Discrete Math Seminar / Probability Seminar
ESB 2012
1324 pattern-avoiding permutations
ESB 2012
Wed 27 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

The field of pattern-avoiding permutations was introduced by Knuth in the 1960s as a way of characterising certain data structures. 
Since then, it has grown into an important area in its own right. There are a number of classical problems, among which is the number of 1324-avoiding 
permutations. We will give some history, and then give  details of a new algorithm we have developed for the generating function for this problem. 
As a result we can count these up to length 50.

A new method of analysis we have developed, which can in some circumstances be an alternative to Monte Carlo analysis, reveals some interesting features. 
In particular, we conjecture that the generating function is not D-finite, and has asymptotics that include a stretched-exponential term. 
(Joint work with Andrew Conway and Paul Zinn-Justin).

The late, great Mark Kac often said that his seminars assumed zero knowledge but infinite wisdom. 
This seminar only assumes zero knowledge and finite wisdom.
hide
Alain Prat
UBC
Thu 28 Sep 2017, 12:30pm
Lunch Series on Teaching & Learning
MATH 126
Getting off on the wrong foot: early identification of “at risk” students in first term calculus
MATH 126
Thu 28 Sep 2017, 12:30pm-1:30pm

Abstract

As an instructor, you have probably observed that a student's performance on the first midterm is strongly correlated with their final grade in the course, and that the lowest performing students on the midterm are often “at risk” of failing the course. In this lunch series I'll discuss two alternative ways of identifying at risk students, in the context of first term calculus. The first involves using data from the pre-calculus diagnostic test and the math attitude survey (MAPS). The second method involves mining data from the first webwork assignment. I'll discuss the variables identified as most important for predicting grades, and how the predictive model I have developed will be used as part of an intervention this semester in Math 180. Lastly, I'll discus some research I have done on “outlier” students whose final grade is far above what would be expected based on their first midterm score alone.  
hide
University of Pennsylvania
Thu 28 Sep 2017, 3:30pm
Number Theory Seminar
Math 126
On free resolutions of Iwasawa modules
Math 126
Thu 28 Sep 2017, 3:30pm-5:15pm

Abstract

The topic of the talk is motivated by certain questions on analytic side of (non-commutative) Iwasawa theory, namely the integrality properties of the p-adic L-function.  Though we are motivated by these properties on the analytic side of Iwasawa theory, our work deals with the algebraic objects, called Iwasawa modules.  We will discuss certain (non-primitive) Iwasawa modules that have a free resolution of length one over appropriate Iwasawa algebras. If time permits, we will consider an application of this result involving an elliptic curve E over Q with a cyclic isogeny of degree p^2.  This is joint work with Alexandra Nichifor.
hide
UBC Math
Fri 29 Sep 2017, 3:00pm
Department Colloquium
ESB 2012
Mathematics and Vantage College
ESB 2012
Fri 29 Sep 2017, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Abstract

Vantage College is an academic program integrating content and language instruction for first-year international students at UBC. Specially designed MATH 100 and MATH 101 courses have been offered to Vantage Science students since the program started in 2014.

In this presentation, I will give an overview of Vantage College, describe some innovations in first-year Mathematics instruction that have been developed in the program, and make some recommendations about how the Mathematics Department might work with Vantage College in the coming years.

Note for Attendees


Light refreshments will be served in ESB 4133, the PIMS Lounge before this colloquium.
hide
 
Top